Rick Murphy

Welcome to the Fort Pierce Sportfishing Club

2013 april Fishing Club Mtg - Whit party 387

Welcome Aboard. . . .

Welcome to the Fort Pierce Sportfishing Club, located in Fort Pierce, the best fishing area in all of Florida. Established in 1980 as a family organization whose members share a common interest in sportfishing, conservation, community service and boating. Our members enjoy both inshore and offshore fishing in local waters that produce spectacular catches in one of the most diverse fisheries anywhere. Come join us the third Wednesday of every month at the Fort Pierce Yacht Club located on the beautiful Indian River starting at 7 pm. Admission is always free and you don’t have to be a member to attend.


Our next meeting is Wednesday, October 19th, at 7 pm.

Club News

Monthly Meeting – Wednesday, October 19th

Guest Speaker – Kadri Benton of White’s Tackle will be our guest speaker this month

Welcome the incoming Board of Directors and Officers for membership year October 1, 2016, through September 30, 2017.

President – Frank  Briganti

Vice President – Jack Yolinski

Treasurer – Darrell Smith

Secretary – Patty Burgess

Board of Directors – Deb Anderson, Jim Anderson, Bob Hain, Lowell Joy, Craig Iserer, Michael Rowland, and Capt Stan Jarusinki

Snook in Sebastian last month from Michael Rowland (click on photos to enlarge)

“I got three over slot reds today off the north jetty in Sebastian. 2.5 hours catching bait and 45 minutes fishing croakers. The pix are of my daughter Lindsay and her boyfriend Steve yesterday. He got his off Melbourne Beach on a fly . . amazing . . and she got hers just south of the inlet on the flats using a jerk bait. The snook are on !!! I am so proud of her !!! She fishes her own boat.”

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St. Lucie County Artificial Reef Program

Tug Kathleen

The Tug Kathleen was finally deployed the end of Sept.

073016 Tug Kathleen with barge and crane081616 Generator and ramp to Tug Kathleen

State Fisheries News

Lionfish Challenge concluded Sept 30

The invasive lionfish took a major hit this summer with a total of 16,609 lionfish removed from Florida waters during the 4.5-month Lionfish Challenge.

Lionfish are a non-native species that were first noted in Florida waters in the mid-80s and have since spread up the Atlantic coast and across the Gulf of Mexico. There is no mechanism for keeping lionfish populations under control except for human removal.

The competition began on Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day, the first Saturday after Mother’s Day (May 14, 2016). A total of 95 people participated in the challenge from across the state and the southeastern United States. Volusia County resident David Garrett took the most lionfish with a total of 3,324 (click on photo to enlarge).

lionfish-challengeFor more information on the Lionfish Challenge and related programs, click here.

Stone crab claw season opened Oct 15 in state and federal waters

Florida’s recreational and commercial stone crab claw harvest season opens Oct 15 in state and federal waters. To ensure this valuable resource is available for generations to come, take care when removing crab claws and follow all protective management guidelines for stone crab harvest.

To be harvested, stone crab claws must be at least 2¾ inches in length when measured from the elbow to the tip of the lower immovable portion of the claw (see illustration). Claws may not be taken from egg-bearing stone crabs. Egg-bearing females are identifiable by the orange or brown egg mass, also known as a “sponge,” which is visible on the underside of the crab when it is picked up or turned over.

Recreational harvesters can use up to five stone crab traps per person. Stone crabs may not be harvested with any device that can puncture, crush or injure a crab’s body. Examples of devices that can cause this kind of damage include spears and hooks. Recreational and commercial traps may be baited and placed in the water 10 days prior to the opening of the season, but may not be pulled from the water for harvest purposes until Oct 15. Traps that are not being fished should be removed from the water to avoid ghost fishing, a process in which marine species get caught in the trap for extended periods of time and are not harvested.

Harvesters are encouraged to take only one claw, even if both claws are of legal size, so that the released crab will be better able to defend itself from predators. A crab that is returned to the water with one claw intact will be able to obtain more food in a shorter amount of time and therefore regrow its claw faster. There is a recreational daily bag limit of 1 gallon of claws per person or 2 gallons per vessel, whichever is less.

The season is open Oct 15, 2016, closing May 16, 2017. Stone crab regulations are the same in state and federal waters.

stone crabFor more information on stone crabs, click here.

FWC’s Saltwater Angler Recognition Programs

The Saltwater Grand Slams Program and two new Saltwater Angler Recognition Programs – the Saltwater Fish Life List and the Saltwater Reel Big Fish – encourage anglers to target a diversity of species, thereby decreasing fishing pressure on any given species as well as expanding fishing experiences for seasoned anglers, cultivating an interest in saltwater fishing and strengthening marine fisheries conservation ethics.

Saltwater Fish Life List

Can you catch them all? Similar to a birding life list, this program allows anglers to track their progress at catching 71 different species of saltwater fish. Anglers who catch at least 10 different Life List species can join the Saltwater Fish Life List Club and receive a certificate of accomplishment, a colorful shirt and be eligible for additional prizes. There are four prize tiers total (10, 30, 50 and 71 fish clubs). Print your Saltwater Fish Life List or request to receive one by mail today at CatchaFloridaMemory.com.

Saltwater Reel Big Fish

Don’t let that whopper of a fish turn into just a whopper of a story. Celebrate your memorable-sized catches by participating in the Saltwater Reel Big Fish program. This program includes 30 different species in both adult and youth (under 16 years old) categories. Successful participants will receive a certificate of accomplishment and a colorful shirt in recognition of their achievement. Anglers who catch 5, 10, 15 or all 30 Saltwater Reel Big Fish species can also gain recognition and the chance to win prizes by joining the Saltwater Reel Big Fish Club.

Saltwater Grand Slams

The FWC has nine different Saltwater Grand Slams that award anglers for catching three different specified fish species within a 24-hour period, and the categories may surprise and challenge you. From the Inshore Grand Slam consisting of red drum, spotted seatrout and flounder, to the Florida Grand Slam of permit, tarpon and bonefish, these challenges will make you work to increase your fishing skills. The program even includes a Small Fry Grand Slam for anglers 15 and under who catch a pinfish, catfish and grunt. Successful anglers will receive a certificate of accomplishment and a colorful shirt showing the fish from their Grand Slam. There are also three prize tiers that award anglers who catch three, six or all eligible Grand Slams.

For more information on the Saltwater Angler Recognition Programs, click here.

FWC’s monthly newsletter for October, Fishing in the Know, is available for viewing
The October 2016 issue of the Fishing in the Know newsletter from FWC is available now. To view and/or download a copy of the newsletter, click here.
An Angler’s Guide to Florida’s Marine Resources, the new edition of Fishing Lines is now available

This guide was developed by FWC’s Division of Marine Fisheries Management Outreach and Education Program as an educational tool to provide the public with information about Florida’s marine resources.

This publication includes articles about marine angling, important habitats, saltwater fishes and state efforts to enhance marine resources. Information is also included about fisheries management in Florida, the importance of catch and release, where money comes from and where it goes and that’s just the first half of the guide.

The second half of Fishing Lines has a field guide to help anglers and the public identify some of the many fish species that live in Florida’s marine and estuarine waters. Illustrations and descriptions for 145 species are included in the Identification Section.

Note:  The guide is an excellent source of fishing-related information and is recommended reading for anyone interested in Florida’s marine resources.

To download a copy of the guide, click here.

Discarded monofilament line injures and kills wildlife

Fishing is an important part of the Florida lifestyle as well as its economy. To ensure that this activity doesn’t lead to problems for birds and other wildlife, the FWC wants anglers to know about the potential hazards and sure-fire solutions. FWC warns that monofilament fishing line and fishing hooks can snag and entangle birds, sea turtles and manatees, leading to injury and even death.

For more information on the statewide Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program, click here.

Federal Fisheries News

NOAA Fisheries seeks public comment on Amendment 37 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region

NOAA Fisheries is proposing to manage hogfish in the South Atlantic as two populations: (1) Georgia through North Carolina and (2) Florida Keys/East Florida. A population assessment determined that the Florida Keys/East Florida population is undergoing overfishing (rate of removal is too high) and is overfished (population abundance is too low) and, therefore, in need of a rebuilding plan. The overfishing and overfished status of the Georgia/North Carolina population is unknown.

The comment period on Amendment 37 ends on December 6, 2016.

For more information, click here.

SAFMC’s quarterly newsletter, South Atlantic Update, is available for viewing
The 2016 summer issue of the South Atlantic Update newsletter from the SAFMC is available now. To view and/or download a copy of the newsletter, click here.

NOAA Fisheries announces red snapper will remain closed to recreational fishing in South Atlantic federal waters in 2016.

For more information on this subject, click here.

NOAA Fisheries announces new Text Message Alert Program

NOAA Fisheries announces the introduction of the Text Message Alert Program. The program allows anyone to sign up to receive important fishery related alerts via text message. Text alerts you may receive include immediate fishery openings and closures as well as any significant changes to fishing regulations that happen quickly.

How to opt-in: Sign up for related alerts for one or more of the following groups. Standard message & data rates may apply. You may opt-out at any time.
  • South Atlantic Recreational Fisheries: Text SATLRECFISH to 888777
  • South Atlantic Commercial Fisheries: Text SATLCOMMFISH to 888777
  • Caribbean Fisheries: Text CARIBFISH to 888777
  • Gulf of Mexico Recreational Fisheries: Text GULFRECFISH to 888777
  • Gulf of Mexico Commercial Fisheries: Text GULFCOMMFISH to 888777

Sharing Knowledge

Club Discount

DeBrooks Fishing Corner, St. Lucie Fishing Center and White’s Tackle offer a 10% discount on items purchased within their stores to members who are currently paid up on their annual membership dues.

discount flyer

Down Rigger Depth Chart (contributed by Cort Schult)

To download a copy of the chart, click here.

Fishing websites & apps

SAFMC has introduced a mobile app on fishing regulations for the South Atlantic. The apps listed below are free at the App Store on iTunes as well as on Google Play.  Also useful is a flashlight app available on both iTunes and Google Play.

A website useful for local tide information is Tides4fishing.com. If you have other apps or websites that you believe may be useful to the Club members, please email them to the Club at fpsc@live.com.

Also, a number of you recommended getting live bait from Dave Maxwell (Dave’s Live Bait). He can be found most days motoring between the Stan Blum boat ramps and the inlet early in the morning. He’s usually done by 8 am. If he’s on the water, he can be reached at 772-519-2104.

Automated VHF Radio Check Service

We all know that having a functioning VHF radio on board is a necessity. Checking your radio to ensure it is working should be done every time you go out boating. In the past, you used to need to make a radio check request and wait for a response, but no longer.

Now you can do it yourself with Sea Tow’s Automated Radio Check Service. Provided as a FREE public service to boating communities nationwide, Sea Tow’s innovative Automated Radio Check Service reduces the volume of non-urgent communications traffic on VHF channel 16, the international hailing and distress channel, while still allowing you to perform the check to ensure that your radio is functioning properly.

VHF Channel 26 serves Fort Pierce.  Google “Automated Radio Check Service” if you wish to read more info on the service.

Tie Knots Professionally

Tie-KnotsPro-Knot Fishing Salt Water Description:

NEW! Featuring knots for fluorocarbon and Spectra. Includes the new Seaguar (fluorocarbon to mono) Knot introduced by the Japanese reps from the Seaguar factory to West Coast tackle shops in early 2003. Also has the rarely published San Diego Jam Knot which can be tied reliably and easily in monfilament, braided and fluorocarbon lines! Read the rest of this entry